Do you have a workshop proposal for the QWF, but feel hesitant about applying? Maybe you’ve never taught before, or you’ve taught a live class, but never taught on Zoom. You know you have something to offer the writing community, but you’re unsure how to go about it.  If this description resonates, then this online seminar (two two-hour meetings spaced a week apart) might be just what you’re looking for.

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Time: two Sundays, 10:00 to 12:00

Duration: 1 November - 8 November, 2020

Location: Online via Zoom—, ,

Description

This workshop is intended for emerging and established writers with professional credentials who are interested in leading a QWF workshop but who lack teaching experience, or for those who want to refine their workshop leading skills in the age of Zoom.

Limited to 10 participants.

Do you have a workshop proposal for the QWF, but feel hesitant about applying? Maybe you’ve never taught before, or you’ve taught a live class, but never taught on Zoom. You know you have something to offer the writing community, but you’re unsure how to go about it.  If this description resonates, then this online seminar (two two-hour meetings spaced a week apart) might be just what you’re looking for.

Before the workshop begins: 

  1. You’ll be asked to submit your workshop idea. No need to explain how you intend to carry out the workshop. That will be worked out during the seminar. All you need is an idea and a literary genre. A sentence or two will be fine. 
  2. You’ll also be asked to submit the title of a book on the craft of writing in your genre that you like, and that can be used to structure the theory side of your workshop. 

Session I (November 1, 2020):  

Our first meeting will be devoted to workshop methodology:  

  1. how to foster trust and community: 
  2. how to avoid becoming a talking head (and how to handle other monopolizers);
  3. how to balance craft theory with hands-on work; 
  4. how participants will submit and share their work;
  5. how to ensure the work of each participant gets equal treatment (time management); 
  6. how to give and receive feedback respectfully and effectively; 
  7. how to handle a conflict; 
  8. how to pivot when the unexpected arises, and your schedule needs on-the-spot adjusting; 
  9. how to avoid copyright infringement;
  10. anything else you wish to bring up for discussion.

You will also be introduced to tips for teaching online, and useful Zoom features to encourage interactive learning.

Homework assignments between the two sessions:

  1. Prepare a workshop outline fleshing out your idea from Session I. 
    It will include a description of your workshop idea and methodology (which you have figured out with ideas from first meeting). You’ll envision how participants’ work can be shared and over what timeline, and what documents participants will need from you – (e.g. documents describing how to submit work, in what form, a presentation sign-up sheet, a workshop protocol sheet for giving and receiving feedback).
  1. Prepare an itinerary (schedule) for the 8 weeks of workshop
    In point form, listing activities you’ll cover each day of the workshop.

Session II (November 8, 2020):  

  1. Review of and feedback on participants’ Workshop Outlines & Itineraries
  2. Q & A, discussion.

When you leave this workshop, you should be well on your way to developing a workshop proposal that meets the QWF’s requirements.


New in Fall 2020: Needs-Based Workshop Scholarships

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Fresh Pages Workshop Scholarships for BIPOC Writers and Playwrights

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Workshop leader

Claire Holden Rothman is a Montreal writer and translator whose novels include Lear’s Shadow (2018), winner of the 2019 Vine Award for Jewish Canadian fiction, My October (2014), a finalist for the Governor General’s Award and nominee for the Scotia Bank-Giller Prize, and The Heart Specialist (2009), also nominated for a Giller. For many years she taught literature and creative writing at Marianopolis College. She has also taught the advanced fiction workshop at McGill and Bishop’s Universities. Her latest literary translation, Sun of a Distant Land (Soleil) by David Bouchet was shortlisted for the 2017 QWF Cole Foundation Translation Prize.   

Register

Registration for this workshop is now closed.

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