Leave a legacy

If QWF has been important in your life, we’d like you to consider setting up a charitable gift now for some time in the future. A gift that you can’t afford now may be feasible after you’ve died. Leaving a legacy is a generous and meaningful way for you to ensure that the organization that has enriched your life has the means to continue to do good in the community. You, and your contribution, will be deeply appreciated and, if you allow it, publicly acknowledged. And the process can be surprisingly simple. What’s more, depending on your situation, it may significantly lower the taxes your estate has to pay.

Some examples:

  • If you are single when you die, or if you and your spouse die at the same time, the money remaining in your RRSP or RRIF is fully taxable. But any percentage that has been allocated to a charitable gift will not be taxable, greatly increasing your capacity to give.
  • If your net income for the year of your death is less than the amount you leave, your estate can claim a rebate against the previous year’s income, which will actually increase the value of your estate.

The easiest way to for you to leave a planned gift is by writing a bequest into your will. That’s how the vast majority of Canadians leave money to the charities they have loved and supported during their lives. With advice from your financial planner and the help of a lawyer or notary, adding a charitable gift to your will generally requires little time and effort.

Sample scenarios:

  • You have two children and a disposable estate of $150,000. Rather than leaving $75,000 to each child, you can leave them bequests of $70,000 each, and leave $10,000 to QWF. It’s an eloquent way to show those you leave behind what you’ve valued.
  • You have many heirs to whom you want to leave specific amounts. You can specify those bequests and direct that the remainder of your estate go to QWF.
  • You have no children but want to support a number of good causes. You can specify percentages of your estate to each charity.
  • You can specify that the gift goes to QWF only if your partner has died before you.

Should I tell my kids?

We do recommend that you talk to your family about the gift and explain why it’s important to you. You can reassure them that because QWF is a registered charity, the money you leave us will help to offset some of the estate taxes. There’s a good chance they’ll prefer sending the money to a charity you have loved in your life rather than to Revenue Canada.

How will QWF use the money?

An unrestricted gift will allow us to apply the funds where we most need them or to invest them for future opportunities. But you can also specify a particular program or prize you’d like to support. The important thing is that we talk about how you would like your gift to be used before you commit it to writing.

What if I change my mind?

If your circumstances change, or you just change your mind, you can always revoke the bequest.

What do I need to know?

Once you’ve spoken to your family, consulted your financial adviser and lawyer, and are ready to put QWF in your will, you have to use our legal name to ensure that the gift goes through. It is:

QWF-Fédération des écrivaines et écrivains du Québec/QWF-Quebec Writers’ Federation

Our charitable registration number is 140319518 RR0001

For more information, or to discuss making a planned gift, please contact Lori Schubert, Executive Director of QWF.

Sample language for your will

“My estate trustees shall pay $______ to QWF-Fédération des écrivaines et écrivains du Québec/QWF-Quebec Writers’ Federation for the purpose of supporting the highest priority needs as determined by the Board of Directors in consultation with the executive director.”

“My estate trustees shall pay $______ to QWF-Fédération des écrivaines et écrivains du Québec/QWF-Quebec Writers’ Federation to support its __ program.”

“My estate trustees shall pay __% of the residue of my estate to QWF-Fédération des écrivaines et écrivains du Québec/QWF-Quebec Writers’ Federation for the purpose of supporting the highest-priority need as determined by the Board of Directors in consultation with the executive director.”

Disclaimer: The material on this site pertaining to legacies is offered as general information and should not be construed as legal or other professional advice. None of the language here should be used without first reviewing it with your own legal and financial advisers to determine whether it is appropriate for your particular tax and estate planning situation.